artist talk, documentary photography, fashion, guest speaker, photography, Richard Kelly, Rick Kelly

Richard Kelly, our latest guest speaker

As we are getting closer to completing the final year, we are not going to have any more tutorials, only individual meetings with our tutors. Last Wednesday, Richard Kelly was our latest guest speaker.

Richard Kelly worked with us in the studio in the first year of our studies. Recently, we also had a lighting workshop with him. However, this time he talked about his photographic career and experience of working with many clients, in many photography fields and doing his personal projects.

He started his photographic career as music bands photographer. He moved on to fashion and was commissioned for Dazed magazine, Elle magazine and shot covers for many other.

His advice was to be flexible and work very fast, as often we don’t get to dictate the rules and will have to work to client’s time scale. For example: when Kelly photographed Amy Whinehouse, he had about 5 to 10 minutes for the shoot; when he photographed a band, he had to shoot in the middle of a night etc. This is one of the reasons why he enjoyed working in fashion best, as he had control of the shoot, the lighting and posing in opposition to bands where he could not choose much, as the client is the one who always dictates the rules.

He was commissioned by Cadbury and claimed that client-based work funds his personal work, as commercial work often pays well.

Fred Perry Way – Ping-Pong and tennis player asked him to create artistic work and payed for it, so according to Kelly this kind of work is always best, as you do what you love, you can shoot what you want, you can be the artist and get payed for it all at the same time.

Kelly has made a few personal projects and his latest one involves a group of young men living in Manchester. He told us that is very difficult to create documentary work, as those people aren’t used to be photographed. That it takes time to get to know the subjects and to negotiate their trust. Similarly, it takes time to make them look relaxed. He recommended to always explain the project, to tell the subject what we want from the shot, ask them what they want from the shot and clarify where we will use the photographs. While photographing people he advised to always talk to them, as it relaxes them, and the more relaxed they look the better the image. When doing commercial work, he also recommended to do something we want, not only what the client is asking for. For example, if we have different ideas how to make the photographs that we should go for it, as we will have something for our portfolio or a new exhibition. To try to think about the bigger picture. I must agree about talking to the subjects, about the difficulty of creating documentary work, so as building subject’s trust.

Kelly also advised us to do the job that pays well even if that it doesn’t interest us. He also told us to get in touch with him after university if we need any help or advice on starting to work in the photography industry, or assisting jobs as he could recommended somebody.

Have a look at Richard Kelly’s website where you will find many other interesting work.

rkellyphoto.com

Alex Beldea, artist talk, documentary photography, final year, photography, university

Working in Photography by Alex Beldea

University of Huddersfield careers and employability service offer a range of guest speakers and workshops to attend. I recently joined “Working in Photography” by Alex Beldea.

Alex Beldea studying PhD in our university and we’ve had a few tutorials with him last year. However, this time he talked about his career in photography, his experience as professional photographer, his clients and job opportunities. I will mention a few of those:

Back in his country, Romania, he worked as a sport photographer. He came to the UK over 7 years ago to study photography. While studying, he volunteered for 3 years where he photographed musicians for HCMF. He claimed that both jobs improved his technical skills.

He volunteered as events photographer for University International Office. His volunteer job lead to many paid job opportunities.

He then took a placement year and worked at photo studio Hylton Photography in Leeds. It taught him how to deal with clients, see real photography work and improved his technical skills. This job opportunity lead to many collaborations, as Beldea is still working with Hylton and until now both photographers help each other.

Through university he gets many opportunities to cover events, in one of those he had a pleasure to photograph a royal family visit. He stated that it was stressful and challenging, as he only had 5 minutes for the shoot however, he claimed that it was a very good experience.

He worked for the University gym Team Hud.

He photographed York chocolate story museum Treat or Trick walking tour.

He photographed DJs, celebrities, food photography – still and moving image for Epicure.

Photographed Wander-clothing collection.

Discover Magazine-researchers within university.

Every summer for about two weeks he shoots Graduation ceremonies at the university, he works from 8am to 5pm, then edits at night.

Photographed costumes for final project costume departments.

Commissioned for Manchester Gallery as international photographer to exhibit his work about Manchester- Second Home

He worked on many personal projects. The Last Shift is about coal mining in Romania which is planned to be closed. He photographed coal mining workers who will soon become redundant.

In Tunisia, Beldea is making a project about a refugee camp. He is photographing and raising money for 35 refugees who are struggle financially.

Alex Beldea’s tips are: to be patience; work hard and find a way to show your work; work in many photography fields, as you will gain new skills and it could lead to more job opportunities; look for places to get feedback; join portfolio reviews, for example Red Eye in Manchester, Photo Meet in London; attend conferences as you may end up having exhibitions and this is the best way to show your work; alongside professional photographer’s jobs do internships or assisting jobs, as again you will improve your technical skills…

What a brilliant talk, one of best I ever attended. In my opinion Beldea is a very talented photographer and I love his commercial work, so as documentary; especially Valid for Travel. I always look at his photographs when looking for inspiration. Thank you, Alex, for sharing your story and giving us very useful advice.

If you would like to see some more work by Beldea, I will recommend you visit his website

alexbeldea.com

artist talk, final year, photography, Sam Laughlin, university

Video chat with Sam Laughlin

Each Friday afternoon we have timetabled speakers talk at uni. Last Friday we had a Skype video chat with Sam Laughlin, who talked about his work and answers our questions.

Frameworks, 2012-15 are photographs of unfinished building and constructions, emphasising the feeling of monumental and transparency, very strong aesthetically created at nigh through long exposure.

In Untitled, Laughlin was commissioned to document constructions where he focused on situation on construction side. His images appear dark, greyish, not as usual black&white. His tonal gradation was made through exposure and developing the film, not much through post production.

Slow Time, 2014 are the photographs of concrete structure, nature, animals, mountains, texture, etc. taken all over the UK and Europe. A state of mind in a black and white photographs is a main element to this work. Meditative photographs, as a result of slow way of looking and considering what to photograph. When the viewer is placed into this stage of mind,  the connection between objects and nature become visible.

Other interesting works: Nest, 2016 and A certain Movement. The movement of landscape, animals behaviour, man made evolution, environmental crisis, landscape shaped the way animals are adapted to…

According to Laughlin, photographs works on tree levels: 1. aesthetics 2, reading the caption 3. poetical and philosophical level

I love the details in every photographs and this sense of intimacy created between the photographer and subjects.

http://www.samlaughlin.co.uk/

artist talk, editorial, fashion, final year, Karina Lex, major project, photography, Uncategorized, uni work, university

Last term at Uni

In the first week of our second semester, our tutors delivered briefs for our two remaining modules. Professional Practise and Major Project. In the first semester we had Research and Development, the Critical Research Summary was submitted, and now this module is over. I got 68% for it and pretty good feedback, not too bad for a first submission.

One part of professional Practise is done – the dissertation. The title of my dissertation was Theoretical concept and the argument that there is not absolute truth in documentary photography. I analysed the theories of some photography critics and examined case studies of documentary photographers which portrayed people as their subject matter. I am glad that the dissertation is over now. Other two parts of this module are blog, website and the final presentation. Another module is Major Project which is our portfolio or photo-books and the final exhibition.

We have 11 weeks left before Easter break, then the submissions on the 10th of May and hopefully in July I will have a degree in Photography. I am so exciting! Especially, that after the graduation I am off backpacking to South America, I can’t wait! But before this I need to crack on with Uni work. Wish me luck!

Last Friday I had a pleasure to attend a Karina Lex’s talk. A brilliant artist who shared with us her story of becoming a photographer and her 12 years’ experience as a freelance photographer. She is a commercial and commissions-based photographer however, she also creates art work, raising money for charities and is interested in fashion, editorial and psychology.

Her advice was to keep going and say yes to opportunities. To approach customers by email, to list all our skills (technical, customer service, physical work, experience with equipment we are familiar with etc) and to write how it could benefit the company we’re applying for. She also told us how important is to always build a relationship with the subject. When asked if she would choose the photographic work opportunity, or a full-time job and doing photography work on a side, she recommended to always look for photographic opportunities, as after full time at work we won’t have time to do anything else. I must agree.

20190118_132006

Lex presented for us her physical portfolio and I must say it looks incredible. A3 size, black leather cover, each photograph appears glossy and creates some kind of the story. It is a bit crazy to say that fashion photography creates a story, but Lex sequenced her images with similar colours and warmness what forms a harmony when looking through it. I love the design which she ordered from Plastic Sandwich (plasticsanwich.co.uk). I will consider this company when I completed university and will search for work.

The best thing about Karina Lex’s talk was that she was very honest with us when talked about her work, experience, portfolio etc.

Amsterdam, artist talk, Colour&Books, final year, major project, photography, uni work

Amsterdam 2019

As soon as I submitted my dissertation on Friday the 11th (such a relief) I packed my stuff and on Sunday the 13th I went to Amsterdam.

It was a university trip and I’ve had so much fun with other photography students and tutors. The trip was full of exciting visits to photo galleries and photographic workshops, but also filled with time to explore the city, wander around the red-light district, having fun ice-skating, enjoying amazing wafflers, beer, lovely food etc.

On the second day we went to Apeldoorn to attend a brilliant session with Sebastiaan Hankeroot from Colour and Books, who designs photo-books. Very inspiring session with lots of useful information about print, paper type, design that reflects and communicates photographer’s intentions and other important stuff to consider when making books, which I will be doing at the end of this semester.

artist talk, documentary photography, final year, major project, photography, portfolio review, university

Rachel Brown Talk and portfolio review

Rachel Brown is Harper’s Bazaar photographic director and fine art photographer. It was a pleasure to meet her and to hear the story about her journey with photography.

Firstly, Rachel told us about her art collage in Huddersfield and BA studies in London. Then she applied for residency in NYC and received a place and how she creates her cinematic photographs and questions the reality.

She imagined fearful situation to then create her fictional narrative work. She wonders around at night to find new place and often put herself in dangerous situations. She works with long exposure and medium format camera. She works with strangers and landscapes. Approaches strangers by creating a casting exchange for prints. Brown also uses self-portraiture in her work, which she comments that it could influence our own practise.

Later, she told us how she approaches the photographer Steven Klein and starts working for him. When she was back to UK, she got a job as Vogue internship, then works with Tim Walker. Finally, to became Harper’s Bazaar photographic director. Where she works with big names, both celebrities and photographers. Wow what a career.

Rachel encourage us to apply for residencies. She has been in few of them and told us that they could format our photographic career. Also, it is a great way to travel, to see new places, meet interesting people and create contacts. What I get from her talk, was to try different things, to build range of skills and technics within many photography fields to then apply in our professional practise.

Portfolio Review

Rachel Brown told me that my subject is very important today and that this political theme is very interesting especially valid right now with Brexit approaching. That my voice should be heard, and I need to humanize the subjects, therefore I need to give more context to each photographed person. That I need to show that migrants are humans and they deserves to be treated as humans. That I should interview people, ask about their experiences as immigrants, their life stories, how long they’ve been here and what job they are doing to show that they are contributing to the country. Additionally, her advice was to start the book with the essay, with very hard-hitting words like facts and statistics what people believe about immigration. Her advise was to ask somebody important to write the essay for me, however I am not sure if I could afford this, but I will definitely try. Brown’s other advice was to print my work as newspaper, with red heading, statistics and to give away to viewers on our final year exhibition. As this theme is going opposite the media, but migration is normally showed in newspapers.

 

artist talk, final year, food photography, photography, portraiture, studio workshop, university

Studio Workshop with Pablo Antoli

Last Wednesday I’ve had a pleasure to attend Pablo Antoli studio workshop.

Antoli showed us how he keeps his photo sessions and other useful documents about the project in Capture one. How he titles them according to the subject matter and date, how he makes folders and subfolders so when he needs the image, he could easily find them. Very useful advice, I need to start doing this. He also showed us how he creates studio portraiture and commercial food photographs with the movement . How he focuses on different point in each image and then blends them in Photoshop.

He explained how large format camera works and let us have a go with it. I love his Camera Sony Alpha 7R II, for its picture quality and lightweight. The camera is very easy to use and it has a very accurate focus point. I was considering buying Nikon D810 body but now I am not sure if I should go for Sony instead.

He biggest advise was to always use light meter when working with a flash, to always be prepared for the shoot, to have a spare battery, camera etc. also to create kit order for the client.

artist talk, final year, major project, photography, portfolio review, portraiture, uni work, university

Artist talk-Pablo Antoli

Pablo is another great photographer who as part of creative exchange week came to uni and talked to students about his practise.

Each of Pablo’s work is different than other, he breaks the boundaries within his creativity. As a commercial practitioner he creates artistic images of food. His travel images are documentary about the place, people, culture, food… His MA work contains found images which he placed into wooden wall and explored what time and decay does to the images. Other work was created by folding images of mountains, rocks, stones into landscapes, then faking sunsets, skies and photograph models as they are landscapes. His recent Sleepers work is an installation created with the mixture of film archives and the landscapes he created in Mexico. The project is about Mexican Revolution and combines projections, risographs and prints on glass.

He shared with us very interesting way of approaching the clients. While travelling, he creates the images about the place, their culture, food then edits them down so photographs creates the story. Then he writes a brief and approach client by sending his work to magazines, restaurants…as part of his professional practice and to gain new customers.

He clarified that his assisting and commercial work fund his living, while money from Mexico allows him to travel and pays for the equipment. Very interesting how he was honest with us and told us that is not easy to make money within photography. That we must always work hard within the field that interest us but also commercially to be able to fund our travel or artistic work.

He advised us to approach photographers and to work with them as photography assistants, as we will gain new skills, get to test new equipment and learn new Technics. Also, to systematically sending our work to clients and photography awards to get our works seen, to gain clients and to receive awards.

If you’re interested in Pablo Antoli’s work, have a look at his websites:

http://anto.li/

http://www.antolistudio.com/

 

 

 

artist talk, final year, photography, uni work, university

Creative Exchange Week, Mario Popham’s talk

What a week, a lot of interesting talks, artist workshops, portfolio reviews…

I am going to start with great photographer Mario Popham

Mario talked about his practise, about the way he started his adventure with photography while studying cinema in the art college. How he came across Cartier Bresson’s work who became his biggest inspiration. Therefore, he learns how to use film camera and decided to travel to India to photograph humanity, photojournalist style in black and white. I am in love with his portraitures created in India. However, at this point he wasn’t sure where is his voice within photography, therefore he went back to UK, looked at other artist like Aleck Soth and started to photograph in Manchester, exploring human’s relationship with the nature. His Enduring Growth is another amazing peace. Since, he knew what his photographs are saying and when his work was exhibited, and he received some awards, he knew that his practise is gaining some momentous. He also became art gallery curator which makes him richer in experience and make him became more creative. He works in collaboration with another artist Tom Baskeyfield. Their collaborated work titled Shaped by Stone was exhibited and will be publish in a book later this year. Thus, Mario created some brilliant personal works, mostly landscapes, while exploring the relationship with nature.

His tip for us – students, was to be nice to our customers, build our contacts and use our instinct, ability, knowledge and always work hard and the clients will come back to us.

Have a look at Mario Popham’s amazing work

http://mariopopham.com/

artist talk, Bella West, documentary photography, final year, major project, photography, portfolio review, portraiture, university

Bella West’s talk, workshop and portfolio review

Last week I’ve had a pleasure to attend Bella West’s talk, to have workshop with the artist and to watch her working in the location.

The artist talked about her work, how mostly she uses natural light or adding reflector if needed and how she uses the space and simplicity in her photographs. She advised us (students) that to be a good photographer we need to be more than just to catch a moment; that we need to create colour harmony in our images. That we need to consider the light, time of the day, place where we photograph, how much shape and space do we use. That the composition is very important to create cohesion between the location and the subject. To not be afraid of playing with dept of field, movement and being creative. Additionally, artist explained that as portrait photographer is very important to make a connection with the subject. To let them be themselves and to bring their own personality into our work. She also told us to get away from our comfort zone and to try to photograph other stuff, different subject, styles, events etc. As each time we gain new skills, experiences and build our confidence within something new to us what makes us stronger as a photographer. Furthermore, West told us that is important to show our work and to enter photography competitions, as it’s always good to be seen and we may land ourselves an award or an exhibition etc.

Portfolio review:

I presented my Bloody Foreigners? work and I received a very good feedback. Bella West said that I am photographing very interesting subject, that the design of my photobook is very good and some of my portraits are strong. She recommended that I should go wider and use more space in my photographs. Also, that I shouldn’t concentrate on the subject directly looking at the camera but could be more playful and portray the subjects while they do their jobs, and through location I could tell more of their story. Additionally, I’ve been told to use colour passport or grey card when I photograph inside. I’ve been also advised that I look at the work of Anastasia Taylor Lind and Gales Duley. Both artists are a real story teller, but I am going to try my best to add this useful advice in my new photographs. I have some new ideas.