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Portfolio Review by very talented photographers – Silvana Trevale and Tom Duffield

Last Friday, as part of our innovation week we’ve had a few photographers visiting our university. Each of us (final year photography students) could choose up to two of them for a portfolio review and a chance to talk about our major projects. The list of photographers who visited uni: Silvana Trevale, Karina Lax, Mario Popham, Sophie Traynor, Jack Greenwood and Tom Duffield. It was difficult to decide, as they are all very interesting people and brilliant photographers however, I chose Silvana Trevale and Tom Duffield, even though they saw my work before.

I chose Silvana, as she specializes in portraiture and working on personal project about Venezuela’s people and their struggle in the country which face financial, political and social crisis. I selected Tom Duffield, as he published an amazing book about his own family living on a small farm. The Whole House is Shaking explores family members emotional echo, a result of living with and later without the father who was a heroin addict. Tom mixes portraitures with still life and text to tell his story, it seems as a landscape of the everyday. I feel as I struggle to find something interesting apart from portraitures to tell my story about immigration, therefore I believed that he could help me out. I showed my dummy book and a few stories hand written by some of the subjects I photographed.

The feedback form Silvana Trevale

According to Trevale “Dog fits with the subject, as the subject looks as a lonely soul for me.” I told Trevale that now I am concentrating on each person as a human being, not just a person who works and contributes to the UK’s economy. She said that “the little girls’ photographs look too commercial, as they are too cute and doesn’t necessarily fit with the rest of the aesthetics. The girl from the end of a book is beautifully lit”. “Try to photograph differently, maybe without them looking at you, so it won’t be too cute”. “You work nice with the environment. You shot a lot since I last saw you. The images of lights could mean that everyone is form different places”. I also asked Trevale to write her own story as an immigrant and she did. Thank you for that. The last portrait with the cross on the wall is Trevale’s favourite. She said that “It’s a good idea to include some portraits with the story, or just a portrait or just a story, as it will help to build up the whole thing”. Her advice was to “keep shooting”. “I like the serious faces best, but you kept the genuine look of people and even that they are smiling it works”.

Tom Duffield’s feedback

“Very interesting project with ongoing issue and Brexit, it become more relevant. Your portraitures developed”. About the image of a man with picture frame above “there is a level of symmetry, the frame in the background intersects with his eye, brings focal point to his eye which is really interesting, strong portrait”. I asked what I should looked at apart from making portraiture to create narrative. Duffield asked “What I am interested with? I said that “the only thing that interest me was their lights or photo frames. As the light shines in their homes and not everyone has chandeliers”. He showed me that one of the portrait (the one with man and photo frame on the wall) “would look good with the image of ashtray and cigarette. As he looks uncertain about the future or as he is waiting for something”. Duffield asked me “What particular you are interested in immigration?” I said that “Immigrants has been discriminated and blamed for just about everything what is wrong in this country, and that I am trying to show that the truth isn’t like this”. I told him about the hand-written stories I am planning to add to the book. He said that I should put portrait along the story to correspond, or if I don’t have a portraiture but a story, then I should add the story next to the light, or something more abstract next to it, or place it on the blank page. The strongest portraits are the ones with natural lights, window light, simple background, nice skin tones. The last image “gives sense of religion”, the additional image of a light hitting the wallpaper – “change white balance”. He pointed out the image of a man with picture frame as its “slightly warm, a bit green, change white balance. If you want consistency, change it to a similar tone. Colour balance and tint and always the most important. About the first portraiture with lady on the bed “Really nice portraiture, nicely lit, painting-ly feel to it, nice composition how she fills the frame. In sense of visual strategies this is very successful portrait, more engaging, beautiful, natural, unguarded and honest”. Duffield also advised me to add description about every photographed person’s work to show how they valued to the country, how they contribute, or photograph their uniform, qualification certificate, or the tools they are using in their work. To show they have a level of expertise and that they contribute something. The project is looking very good and will be nice on the wall.

Thank you guys, I appreciate your feedback.

If you would like to see Trevale or Duffield’s works have a look at their website, I think they are both brilliant photographers with a lovely personality.

silvanatrevale.com

thomasduffield.com

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Visiting Art Galleries

On the typical weekend apart from shooting for my major project, my family and I would backpack, wear hiking boots and go exploring UKs landscapes however, this weekend was different. As the weather wasn’t good, we decided to visit art galleries instead.

In the morning, I’ve had my first weekend shift volunteering for Hepworth Wakefield. Due to prints fair, it was very busy, I don’t think I have ever seen Hepworth as full before. In the first hour, I was meeting and greeting visitors near welcome desk. As I am still learning and I only spent an hour there before, seeing all these visitors coming from every direction I was a bit stressed however, working with all this nice and helpful people absolutely helps a lot. After busy hour it was time to go upstairs and looking after the galleries. The rest of my shift went very nice and quick, talking to visitors and other gallery hosts. When I finished, my boyfriend picked me up and we went to Leeds where we spent a nice afternoon visiting art galleries.

Firstly, we went to Leeds Art Gallery. To mark the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, Leeds Art Gallery display a range of da Vinci’s greatest drawings. The exhibition is free to visit and will be open to public until 6 of May. If you haven’t seen it yet, I would recommend it as it’s totally worth it. Seeing da Vinci’s art always feels as a pleasure and seeing these exact drawings could be one of a life time experience. Most of the drawings are small, framed in A4 or A3 sizes however, there is one enormous depicted horse. There is a variation of different forms from mechanical engineering and sculpture to architectures and human’s anatomy. What’s mostly visible in da Vinci’s drawings are the huge amount of details, his skulls, so as body parts appear as real body x-rays or scans.

After da Vinci exhibition, we went to explore the rest of gallery. There are many impressive and Huge paintings, so as sculpture and photographs. I liked the frame of John Hilliard’s photographs. I need to think about my final year exhibition, and this is a very good example to consider it for my photographs.

After Leeds Art Gallery, we went to visit The Tetley, to see the 22nd International Contemporary Artist Book Fair. There were many interesting artists selling their art. I got myself an interesting book and collected a few business cards from publishers and printing companies.

On Sunday morning, I’ve had a photoshoot. The day was dark and dull, but thankfully I manage to make some new photographs for my project. When I came back, my boyfriend, our daughter and I went to visit Hepworth Wakefield. Firstly, we went to Calder building for a Print Fair.The building is both huge and bright, great place for this kind of events. It was a very busy place, but great to see so many interesting artist’s stalls, so as galleries and print makers. Again, I looked at frames, to get the idea for my exhibition. There were a few good ones, but so expensive, I decided to make my mind up about the size and the colours first.

From Print fair we went to The Hepworth Wakefield. It felt good being a visitor this time, especially that yesterday was super busy. I showed my little family around Hepworth’s new amazing exhibition. Magdalene Odundo’s The Journey of Things, and other wonderful art from all over the world, both ancient and contemporary who inspired Odundo’s work. Both my child and my boyfriend were overwhelmed by Egyptian Canopic Jars; however, apart from this my daughter wasn’t too impressed, she’s only 9 years old and unfortunately she gets bored in the art galleries. Never mind, I am sure that one day she will appreciate the art.

If you haven’t seen Magdalene Odundo’s exhibition and/or haven’t visited The Hepworth Wakefield, you should definitely do it. It’s an amazing place full of wonderful art.

I’ve had a lovely weekend, filled with amazing art.

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Talk and portfolio review by our Guest speaker Theo Simpson

Yesterday, Theo Simpson visited our university and gave us a fantastic talk about his practise.

Firstly, Simpson talked about another photographers’ work who influenced his practise. William Christenberry’s Green Warehouse, 1978 was one of the first image which made Simpson realise that he wants to become a photographer. To be able to use his visual language in communication. According to Simpson this image isn’t just a depiction of a green house, but the photographer’s dedication to the subject matter, as he became friend with the owner and for 25 years, he returned to the place every year to photograph it again and again and again. John Smith’s photographs inspired Simpson in a way that he realised that the photographer doesn’t have to travel the world to create amazing work. As Smith made his work in his door step, no further that 3 miles away for his house. Paul Graham’s Beyond Caring, 1986 gave Simpson the idea of how powerful the photography could be within communication in the world. Graham couldn’t photograph in job centre, but somehow, he manages to use his large format to make a very powerful photograph which carries historical context of high unemployment in the UK.

When Simpson finished university, he became one of those unemployed, it made him think why did he studied? Why does he want to make photographs? Are his photographs enough to talk about his thoughts? He started to make photobooks. He was always interested in consumerism, technologies, news feed but also what’s under his feet-as landscapes. He thinks that the life we are living in are completely manipulated by all the above.

Photography for Simpson is the experience of exploration of the world and the communication to people. He thinks that good work come from original thoughts and expressions. Very useful advice, as he told us to think what makes us different than the others. Book making process taught him the understanding of materials, the discipline and the level of sacrifice. He used multiple visual languages in his work; different materials, variation of printing technics, scans of the objects, photographs of surrounding, objects etc. He believes that photographers toolset become limited, as there is a lot to consider when making photographs; like the lighting, location, time of the day, what camera do you use, what lens, what point of view, angle…

Fallowing the talk, I had a chance to show Simpson my work. He told me that the dept to the story is visible through my dummy book and that I engage with a lot of people. That my portraitures are strong, intimate and quiet. That I should ask myself question if the additional images doing their job. If I really need them. I told him that I am planning to add a text to my book. His advice was to be very careful and to consider what text will I add, as text could be literal, and I could gain something but also lost something. He told me to consider text as French folded, pull outs or hidden. About the introduction for my book, his advice was not to add the text at the beginning but at the end. So, each viewer will go through the book, then read the text which could mean totally differ things that what they thought of photographs. He advised me to look at other practitioners who added text in their work, like for example Sophie Cale-Blind, and to read Working from Memory.

It was a pleasure to meet you Theo and thanks for your advice.

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Studio lighting and retouching workshop with Sophie Traynor

This week’s workshop was about studio lighting and the retouching process.

Sophie Traynor specialises in food, fashion, hair and beauty photography.

In the beginning she explained the way she photographs people and the lighting she uses. When photographing in the studio she always sets up her camera to ISO 100, f.8 and 1/125s to start with. The lighting is always position on the side of the model, and the model very close to the light (image 1). At first light is always set up to half of the power. When the lighting isn’t as she planned, she moves the light towards the front of a model. If the lighting still isn’t as desire, she move the lighting and/or adds the reflector on the other side of model’s face until she have the desire results (Image 2). Next, she adds one light towards the background, so it doesn’t look flat and has more tones. To make the background white, she adds two lights positioned towards the background (Image 4). This setting just proves that we don’t need to have many lights to created beautiful images.

If something aren’t going right, Traynor’s advice was to always check if things are plugged in. We, the photographers must agree, as perhaps everyone had some problems when shooting in the studio; stressing as something broke, but thankfully it was only unplugged.

However, in the fashion and beauty standards, photo shoot is only the begging as each photographs requires a lot of retouching. Traynor showed us the way she edits her beauty images. To start with she is using healing brush to get rid of unwanted stuff like for example hair. She is editing pictures in black and white, as she thinks that some stuff are more visible than in colour. She uses non destructive editing and always keeps the original file. Next she uses curves to make the image slightly lighter and uses brush, or dodge and burn tools to darken or brighten the area on the skin. She also uses selective colour if some colours doesn’t look as it meant to.

Treynor suggested that if we are thinking about this business is very important to have a team of people who together create a great shot. To consider fashion stylist, make-up artist, hair stylist. It will make your work easier and pictures wont required as much retouching.

Treynor told us to always learn new stuff within retouching, but even we knew more, we should do less. As the less we do for an image the better for the image.

Within food photography, similar to fashion or beauty Traynore mostly uses simple lighting. Soft box right up to the edge of a table and if needed she adds reflector on the other side of the product. According to Treynor, the closest we get to the light, the better shadows and contrast it will create.

The fallowing day, Sophie Traynor gave us a talk about her few years adventure as a freelance photographer. She told us to always be prepared for the photo shoot and to practise the lighting even on a friends or family. She said that we don’t need to move to London to have clients, as well as we don’t have to work as photography assistant. She build her own photographic kit, however she encouraged us to rent stuff, as we could charge client for it and won’t have to spend thousand pound for a new lens for example. She uses two lenses 100 mm for hair, beauty and food photography and 24-70 mm for fashion. She said that having anxiety before each shoot is totally normal, as when you stressing it means that you care. Additionally, facing difficulties is part of this job, but we get to do what we love. She said that “it feels as jingle fire sometimes, but you need to learn how to jingle the fire.”

Her biggest advice was to be nice, reasonable and communicate well, be honest even about the problems which appears to have returned clients. Off course there are other stuff, you need to prove yourself that they can trust you and build the relationship with a client. I really enjoyed this talk so as the workshop. Another guest speaker who deliver very useful talk and was pleasure to meet, for her honestly, great sense of humour and a lovely personality.

Check some more of the amazing work at sophietraynor.com

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Large Format Camera Workshop

Last Thursday we’ve had a large format workshop with one of out tutor Yan Preston.

Yan explains what is a large format, how does the camera works and why its been widely used even thought being huge, heavy and considered as a very slow and expensive process of making photographs. Large format is used for the quality and beauty of images and for huge size that photographs could be printed. Yan also introduced some artist who as well as her uses large format in their photography. For example Alec Soth, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Sally Mann-Immediate Family, Alys Tomlison, Awoiska von de Molen, Taryl Simon-American Index, Andreas Gursky-River Rhine. According to Alec Soth the subject become less conscious when photographed by the large format, as the photographer is under cloth, so the subject don’t get to see when the image is taken (You tube, Alec Soth: Portraits – The Ground Glass).

In the second part of the workshop Yan explained how to use large format camera, how to put the film in it and how to set up the exposure. We then went outside and each of us had a chance to take two images. There were a lot of stuff to remember but Yan told us that we can only learn it by use it and that we can learn from our own mistakes!

I really enjoyed and this session and looking forward to see how our images turns out.

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Lewis Chaplin from Loose Joints publications guest speaker

Last Friday I had a pleasure to attend Lewis Chaplin’s talk.

Chaplin talked about his adventure with photography, as well as publications, book making and designing process. He made his first book when he was a teenager, printed in numerous examples and sent it to many publishing companies. Someone got back to him and this was his first step towards his carrier. He then introduced us to his publishing company Loose Joints he created together with his partner. As well as speaking about the books he published, he brought many physical examples of them, so we could have a chance to look through. One which catches my eyes was about fetish and called 2041. Book isn’t as interesting, but the way Chaplin talked about his relationship with the photographer and how they become friend and shared their interest in dressing up, was very interesting and really funny. The book contains self-portraiture, where the artist performs in his own house, but as he covers his own body in a various textiles, he always remains anonymous.

The most interesting for me was a book called Homes by Harley Weir. Weir created his body of work in refugees camp in Calais in 2016. I love the context of the book and the way she photographed the camp, which shows migrants’ struggle and the conditions they get to live in. She doesn’t’ just raised the awareness of the migrants situation in the camp, but also raised the money for human rights charities in the area.

After the guest speaker, we went to our base room and was able to show our work to Lewis Chaplin. He was very useful and gave me some good ideas. He said that I have a lot of strong portraits, but as a viewer he can not get the message I am trying to say to the viewers. Therefore, he advised me to add a lot of text, like essay, subject’s stories, facts, statistics etc. He suggested to talk to each photographed people and ask about their feelings, if they feel frustrated, or as they are working too hard, or are they under valued?… I told him that I am planning to mix the subjects with their belongings, so as their stories and he said that this is a good idea, as I shouldn’t give the viewers every answer, as it may changes their perception.

If you would like to see some more Loose Joins publications, check their website

http://www.loosejoints.biz

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Portfolio review by Karina Lax and Sian Bonnell

As part of our Friday mornings group portfolio reviews this time we were joined by Karina Lax. Firstly, Lax said that I have a interesting name for a photographer. It may sound exciting, but she doesn’t know the real meaning of my surname and I didn’t tell her (exactly it means an “orphan”, but it also used to call somebody “walking disaster” and I truly hate it). Coming back to my portfolio, Lax was impressed with my work and picked up a few of my best portraiture. However, she pointed out a few which aren’t best. She added that I should always think about the context, subjects face expressions, their hand gestures and keep an eye on the composition, so there won’t be any distractions (she said it as one of my subject is dressed in dirty clothing and has his hand in his pocked, what means that he is insecure or somehow distress and that I should edit it to look clean; however, I replied that he is a farmer and that’s the message I want to communicate). Lax suggested that I have a lot of portraiture and should add more conceptual images to create the narrative about the subjects and their story. She recommended to experiment with the edit and mixed up subject’s stuff and pair them up with the person they don’t belong to (this is the second person who suggested this, and I must say I like the idea). She recommended to look at some photographer’s work: Liz Hingley for lighting and narratives and Tom Hunter for his staged narratives

If you would like to see Karina Lax’s work check out her website: http://www.karinalax.com

On Friday afternoon Sian Bonnell was our guest speaker. She talked about her photographic journey right from the university, until now, 40 years as a practitioner. She shared her story about going back to photography when she became mother; she paid a child minder to look after her children and went out to create her artistic images. Mainly juxtaposed household item in the landscape (biscuits cutters, jellies etc), or used food and domestic items to recreate landscapes for example: ham on the wall. She plays with boundaries and mixing reality with fantasy. This kind of photography has not much to do with mine however, I am glad to be part of this talk; as Bonnell has a great personality, made us laugh all the way and gave us an important lesson. She suggested that we should not take it personally when people criticize our work (she said that the older she gets, the less care she became about what other people say). That we should love our work as if we don’t, it won’t be any good, but if we do, that’s when best work will arise. She believes that the camera is her partner in crime and makes her behave badly. Photography for Bonnell isn’t a subject but a tool for translation, it has philosophy. Bonnell also tried self-portraiture, where she reperformed painting’s gesture or her state of mind. The funniest story she told us was where she got commissioned for children surrealism and when she created a scene of crime, she got rejected. I am glad to have a pleasure to meet her for her creativity and lovely personality.  

After the guest speaker, some students and I met Sian in our base room. We’ve had a chance to talk to her and to show our works. According to Sian my work is good and interesting. Bonnell suggested that I need to add a lot of text for my photo book, as pictures can’t express everything what I am trying to communicate to the audience. Bonnell recommended to add newspapers articles, headings about Brexit or other fictional headlines. She also gave me a few photographers to consider researching Rosie Martin, Tom Duffield, Jo Spence, Sian Davey, Mathew Finn and Guy Martin-Syria.

If you interested to see Sian Bonnell’s work have a look at her website: http://www.sianbonnel.com/

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Lens Culture Portrait Award 2019

Today, I entered a single image for Lens Culture Portrait Awards 2019.

I chose this image, as I love the lighting, so as subject’s pose and the composition.

The image is part of my project about the foreign people who live and work in the UK. The image doesn’t necessarily communicate what’s my project about. But as the subject is looking away it gives me impression as she is missing something, possibly her country of birth or the family who lives there. As the media relentlessly portray immigrants as damaging to the UK, she feels displaced, just like perhaps every foreign born; and since the public voted for Brexit, she feels unwanted in the UK, broken apart between their country of birth and the country of residence, so as many other European Union’s immigrants, including myself. While each of us is different, none of us knows our future in here. One day we could end up like one of those poor South Americans, which UK decided to kick out of the country.

I choose the Lens Culture competition for many reasons. Firstly, as its free entry for a single image (which is significant, as being student I need to be careful where I am spending my money) and most importantly for great opportunities.

  • Possibility to have work exhibited at Aperture Gallery in New York City’s Chelsea district
  • A chance to receive press coverage from publications and media outlets around the world.
  • A chance to have work reviewed by Lens Culture editors for immediate exposure in their Competition Gallery and across all their online channels, reaching a combined audience of over three million.
  • An opportunity to have the work reviewed by International Jury
  • “Entrants to our Awards receive massive online exposure throughout the competition”
  • “Winners, finalists and selected entrants have been featured in major publications like BBC, The Guardian, The Washington Post, Internazionale, VICE, The Times of London, Huffington Post, Spiegel Online, The British Journal of Photography, and The Telegraph.”
  • “Selected works will be screened at photo festivals and events worldwide. Over the past year, our winners and finalists were screened at festivals in the UK, Greece, Croatia, Italy, Japan, Australia, Spain, France, the US, and more.
  • “Lens Culture is continually forging new partnerships with leading photo festivals around the world (like Voies Off, FORMAT, Tokyo International Photography Festival, and more) to increase exposure and showcase opportunities for our winners and finalists from our competitions.”
  • have the work “Published in the best of Lens Culture, volume 4”

Deadline for entries: Wednesday, the 20th of February 2019

To find out more about the competition check Lens Culture website:

https://www.lensculture.com/photo-competitions/portrait-awards-2019

Wish me luck!

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Volunteers program

Last Thursday we’ve had a visit form one of University volunteer, who talked about the opportunities available for students around the campus as part of SU volunteers program . She explained how to register, how to apply for each role and how important is to give our spare time. As well as helping others, volunteers job has a lot of benefits too. For example to gain experience, to learn new skills, to develop contacts and network within creative community, to build our confidence, as well as improve our listening skills, problem solving, developing social skills, working as part of the team or as leadership of the organisation…all to build our CVs, which will be very useful when we graduate and start to look for a job.

Fortunately, I am aware of volunteers opportunities as I am already volunteered for The Hepworth Wakefield. I’ve had an induction day last Wednesday and yesterday, I’ve had my first shift as the gallery host. I must say I enjoyed it. I love The Hepworth for its kind and helpful people, for the beautiful view surrounding the gallery and of course the variety of amazing art. I meet some interesting people, everyone made me feel welcome and was happy to help if I had any question. I am very grateful for the opportunity to became part of this amazing place and I am definitely looking forward to my next shift, but firstly I will have a training about the new exhibition – Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things. I am looking forward to the training, as being part of the visitors experience team, I need to be prepared for the questions asked by gallery visitors. As stated everyone made me feel welcome and my job is to be helpful and to make visitors feel welcome. I am very thankful to be part of this amazing place. It feels as a dream job for me, as I love talking to people especially about the art. If you ask my boyfriend, he would perhaps say that I talked too much, but luckily this job allows me to be chatty.

On Friday the 15th of February, 7-10 pm is the opening party of Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things.

Free entry, pop-up bars, Resident DJ Andy Hickford… Its going to be amazing evening, so make sure you join us!

Find out more at:

hepworthwakefield.org/opening-party

artist talk, editorial, fashion, final year, Karina Lex, major project, photography, Uncategorized, uni work, university

Last term at Uni

In the first week of our second semester, our tutors delivered briefs for our two remaining modules. Professional Practise and Major Project. In the first semester we had Research and Development, the Critical Research Summary was submitted, and now this module is over. I got 68% for it and pretty good feedback, not too bad for a first submission.

One part of professional Practise is done – the dissertation. The title of my dissertation was Theoretical concept and the argument that there is not absolute truth in documentary photography. I analysed the theories of some photography critics and examined case studies of documentary photographers which portrayed people as their subject matter. I am glad that the dissertation is over now. Other two parts of this module are blog, website and the final presentation. Another module is Major Project which is our portfolio or photo-books and the final exhibition.

We have 11 weeks left before Easter break, then the submissions on the 10th of May and hopefully in July I will have a degree in Photography. I am so exciting! Especially, that after the graduation I am off backpacking to South America, I can’t wait! But before this I need to crack on with Uni work. Wish me luck!

Last Friday I had a pleasure to attend a Karina Lex’s talk. A brilliant artist who shared with us her story of becoming a photographer and her 12 years’ experience as a freelance photographer. She is a commercial and commissions-based photographer however, she also creates art work, raising money for charities and is interested in fashion, editorial and psychology.

Her advice was to keep going and say yes to opportunities. To approach customers by email, to list all our skills (technical, customer service, physical work, experience with equipment we are familiar with etc) and to write how it could benefit the company we’re applying for. She also told us how important is to always build a relationship with the subject. When asked if she would choose the photographic work opportunity, or a full-time job and doing photography work on a side, she recommended to always look for photographic opportunities, as after full time at work we won’t have time to do anything else. I must agree.

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Lex presented for us her physical portfolio and I must say it looks incredible. A3 size, black leather cover, each photograph appears glossy and creates some kind of the story. It is a bit crazy to say that fashion photography creates a story, but Lex sequenced her images with similar colours and warmness what forms a harmony when looking through it. I love the design which she ordered from Plastic Sandwich (plasticsanwich.co.uk). I will consider this company when I completed university and will search for work.

The best thing about Karina Lex’s talk was that she was very honest with us when talked about her work, experience, portfolio etc.

documentary photography, exhibition, final year, photo gallery, photography, Uncategorized

Second Interim Show

Huddersfield, Market Hardware Gallery. From 14th to 20th of December will be open for the public.

Come round a have a look at our amazing work. While my fellow peeps chose fashion, landscape, still life etc, I presented my favourite documentary photography. Peer review tomorrow. Lets see what feedback I will get.

What do you think about my work?

 

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Bloody Foreigners? New Work

Bloody foreigners? project portrays people who live and work in the UK.

This anti-racist documentary body of work was created to communicate the awareness, to change people’s views and to convey the message about the positive impact of the immigration working in the UK. Bloody Foreigners? questions people’s opinion about racism and the discrimination of the foreign and consequently, portrays the relationship between the photographer (me), the subject and their environments.

I hope you like my new images. If you have any questions, any ideas about the work or if you would like to be photographed please drop me a text.